Jul. 4th, 2012

taleanea: Talea's default user icon. (malen [01])
Recently I decided that I needed more practice in plotting before trying it with my current novel, so I took a movie of which I had disliked several main plot points and developed a new story that would correct everthing I had hated about the original one.

I went scene by scene to have a good length for it, and changed each one of them into scenes that I would enjoy, that went how the story should IMTHO have gone:

I built about 8 plot archs (one of them the main plot) with the Hollywood Formula and the 7 Point System, and put all the key plot points of the entire story into these formula points, and interlinked them to make them emotionally stronger.

Then I applied all of these ~8x7 important plot points to the 60+ scenes the original movie has, overlaid my new plot points with the original scenes and merged them nicely.
(If you could look closely you'd still recognise which movie I chose to rewrite replot, so if I were to write and publish my version I'd probably still have to change a few things like, you know, instead of it taking place in a desert I could instead let it play out underwater, instead of having computer obsessed geek friends my hero'd have horse obsessed, secretly dragon riding friends — unimportant stuff like that might make all the difference in copying other people's stuff.)

Once that was done and I had learned plotting I completely lost interest in that movie, or my newly created up-graded story. I wasn't a fan of that movie and so I'm not impressed with my own story outlines for it either.
Why would I? I cared about learning to plot and about finding out where the movie had failed for me: how it actually should have gone. - Mission accomplished, and now I have a completed novel outline laying around, doing absolutely nothing. (Maybe one day…)

Anyway. That was quite a while ago. By now I've forgotten how it worked, how I plotted that story, how I interlinked all the different story arcs, how I implemented the different plot points into the story — so of course now I'm doing it again with the story that I had actually wanted to write. Waste of time, much? … No. It did teach me stuff, and relearning is faster than learning something for the first time. Also, it had been fun.

So, I've been plotting.
2 plot arcs down, and - so far - 5 more to go. But I do know the whole story already; this is for zooming in, finding details, and for creating a stable, working structure for the story.

Next up: Plotting the scenes in such a way that I don't fall asleep when I think of them.

I get bored too easily because writing is so slooooow-motiony.
That's why my stories often read like roller-coster rides, because when I wrote them in slow motion I needed them to be as exciting as talealy possible to not get bored myself. Boredom makes me furios with the souce of it and then I refuse to touch that boring stuff ever again.

Except, of course, when the Muse kisses me, hmmmm, then I can write as boring as I want to and love the process & the resulting stories anyway.

Weird, I know. But, you know — kisses!




PS: Others' Check-Ins: Linky Links
PPS: On plotting: [1] [2]

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Talea Nea

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